Author Topic: The Book of R, by Tilman M. Davies  (Read 9 times)

forbitals

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The Book of R, by Tilman M. Davies
« on: January 19, 2019, 07:29:57 pm »
So this is a very large book.

The Book of R, by Tilman M. Davies  ( 2016 No Starch Press )
https://www.amazon.com/Book-First-Course-Programming-Statistics/dp/1593276516/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1547944745&sr=8-1&keywords=The+Book+of+R%2C+by+Tilman+M.+Davies

So this though deals a great deal with statistics, instructing us about statistics, as opposed to laying out the critical computer issues.  These later are more of my current interest.  They recommend their other book:

The Art of R Programming: A Tour of Statistical Software Design, by Norman Matloff
https://www.amazon.com/Art-Programming-Statistical-Software-Design/dp/1593273843/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1547944950&sr=8-1&keywords=art+of+r+programming

And then what I think really will give me what I want:

R Packages: Organize, Test, Document, and Share Your Code, by Hadley Wickham
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/1491910593/ref=dbs_a_def_rwt_bibl_vppi_i3

So let me try and record some of the more important stuff in the Tilman Davies book.

Official Site, should have good online documentation
https://www.r-project.org/

CRAN
Comprehensive R Archive Network

R has its own GUI, with two windows nominally, Console and Editor.

Package used in the book, 'MASS'

book about it from S

Modern applied statistics with S / W.N. Venables, B.D. Ripley. (2002)

so  you can install, update, or remove packages.

You can also get help, ?? or ? about something.

There are third party editors, but the most well liked is Rstudio
https://www.rstudio.com/

And there is Rmarkdown, making your work repeatable.

a (dot)Rdata file holds everything from your R session.

You can type stuff into R, using it as a calculator.

Works well with directory trees and paths, and you can view this.

Vectors are important, as we have seen in APL ( Array Processing Language )

Matrices are two dimensional. Arrays can be 3, not sure if it can be more.  But still seems to fall far short of a deeply object oriented language.

So you can do all sorts of matrix operations, including the inverse, as 'solve'

Matrix computations / Gene H. Golub, Charles F. Van Loan (2013)   looks really really good.  Davies though is referencing an earlier edition.

But still need more than this.

Non-Numeric Values:
TRUE and FALSE, logical comparisons, strings and characters, concatenations.

***************************

*New* Mormonism, "The Angel and The Sorcerer," Peter Lavenda ( surprising indeed, LDS being really an occult group, and coming from same sources as Scientology )
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DaIjm84SPUo&spfreload=5

Peter Levenda | Lovecraft, The Yazidi, & Middle Eastern Magic  ( this Peter Levenda is always extremely interesting to listen to )
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DzxuMtAPyyE

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aRU9tgr_9vc

Stones Play List
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vC0Qt1lvLq8&list=PLFFC0DE5C257B32AF&index=1

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forbitals

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Re: The Book of R, by Tilman M. Davies
« Reply #1 on: January 22, 2019, 07:27:35 pm »
NaN, Inf, NA, TRUE, FALSE

ggplot2, Hadley Wickham

XLConnect, for Excel

Can do JSONs and BSONs?

variadic behavior, the use of elipses, dot dot dot.

helper funcitons

Errors and Warnings, Formal Notifications

TExtual Progress Bars

Masking, containing object names in packages which conflict with other things having the same names.

Data Frame variable distinction

Centrality:  Mean, Median, Mode

Counts, Percentages, Proportions

Quantiles, Percentiles, and the Five Number Summary

Bar Plots and Pie Charts

Histograms

Scatterplots

Events and Probability, Conditional Probability

Shape, Skew, and Modality

Bernoulli Distribution

Binomial Distribution

Poisson Distribution

Normal Distribution

Exponential, and t-distributin

Sampling Distributions and Confidence

Hypothesis Testing

p-value

ANOVA, Analysis of Variance

One Way ANOVA

Two Way ANOVA

Simple Linear Regression

Greek Symbols in R,  Murrell and Ihaka 2000

LATEX, TEX

ggplot or qplot?

Pixel Images

Interactive 3D Plots

Point Clouds

R Markdown

Student's T Distribution

Kruskal-Wallis Test


seeplusplus

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Re: The Book of R, by Tilman M. Davies
« Reply #2 on: April 17, 2019, 04:29:10 am »
"Matrices are two dimensional. Arrays can be 3, not sure if it can be more.  But still seems to fall far short of a deeply object oriented language."

Arrays can be as many dimensions as you like. Only constraint is memory.